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Hi.

Our thumbs are basically numb from texting back and forth 24/7 about everything we love (AND HATE) that's happening on our televisions, iPads, and eye glasses (hi, we think we're funny) and we thought WHY NOT SHARE THIS JOY WITH THE WORLD?!  

WHAT BAD ASS FEMINISTS READ THIS YEAR: MEGAN STIELSTRA

WHAT BAD ASS FEMINISTS READ THIS YEAR: MEGAN STIELSTRA

The very best, most wonderful thing about the end of the year is the deluge of END OF YEAR LISTS. We LOVE top 10 lists, and top 100 lists, and Oprah's Favorite Things, and even lists of the worst things of the year. Lists are magic they usually bring a smile to our face, and remind us EVEN IN 2017 ... joy was had. We wanted to come up with our own list for this year and decided what we really want to know is what our favorite BAD ASS FEMINISTS read this year. So we'll be bringing you a list of books from some of our favorite women.

Up first is Megan Stielstra. Megan wrote one of our favorite books of the year, The Wrong Way to Save Your Life. If you haven't read The Wrong Way to Save Your Life yet, FIX YOUR LIFE ... the internet is made for shopping (we linked to the book what are you even waiting for). If you have read it, then you know you need to buy 900 copies and give one to everyone you know. Enjoy Megan's list of favorite books she's read this year, what did you read and love this year? We'd love to hear from you!

The Dark Dark

by Samantha Hunt

I read a story from this collection in the New Yorker and when I got to the end I had to sit down. I was dizzy, lightheaded. I hadn't been breathing. I went online and ordered everything Hunt has ever written, which I read back-to-back in a single mind-bender of a weekend. Hunt is brilliant. Her stuff makes me want to work harder.

 

Code of the West

by Sahar Mustafah

Reviewers have compared Sahar Mustafah to Chekov: the seemingly quiet and deeply personal observations of her characters will shatter your whole heart. I'd agree and take it a step further: she gives that dude a run for his money. The stories that make up Code of the West dig hard into family and faith and politics, all told with profound love and near-cinematic detail. Hi, HBO. Here's your next hit.

What About the Rest of Your Life

by Sung Yim

This is Sung Yim's debut memoir and it shattered me in the best possible way. It's about living and surviving and the mess of forgiving ourselves. Yim is a brilliant craftsperson; poetic and precise. I felt this book in my body. I want to shove it into all of your hands with a box of Kleenex and a bottle of Maker's Mark and your best friend because you'll keep looking up from the pages like I HAVE TO TALK TO SOMEONE ABOUT WHAT I JUST READ and the someone next to you better be amazing.

We Are Never Meeting in Real Life

by Samantha Irby

I carry this book around in my bag. My copy is shredded. I read it whenever I need to laugh which these days is every day because jesusgod if we don't laugh we'll jump off the roof. PSA: I started reading this book on the L heading north from downtown. I laughed so hard that people sitting next to me asked if I was okay (thanks, Chicago!) and I said I was fine but the truth is I peed my pants at Lake and had to sit there all the way to Loyola which, if you don't know my city, is way too long for an adult woman to sit in pee.

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Megan Stielstra is the author of three collections including The Wrong Way to Save Your Life from Harper Perennial. Her work appears in Best American Essays, the New York Times, Guernica, Tin House, the Rumpus, and on National Public Radio She teaches creative nonfiction at Northwestern University.

 

THE OPRAH FOOD TASTE TEST

THE OPRAH FOOD TASTE TEST

THE VERY SPECIAL RANDALL EPISODE (THIS IS US RECAP)

THE VERY SPECIAL RANDALL EPISODE (THIS IS US RECAP)